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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
. bernanke said it. a lot of people said it. and then i said it after you said it. >> i know it. and you're on optimist. >> i am an optimist. >> in terms of why i thought it was contained was, first of all, i was talking about subprime and we made the mistake of just simply saying the subprime was not big in relation to a 13, $14 trillion u.s. economy. and what was really going on is we were talking about housing overall and since world war ii, housing, residential home prices, had generally gone up. and the mortgages were just considered to be very safe investments. and so the kind of decline we saw was something that was not envisioned in any kind of model. it wasn't anything that many people that were close it to -- after the fact, it seems obvious to all of us. but the -- and so when you had the kind of decline we saw in housing prices that changed the behavior of those of homeowners, and, also, the other thing you and i were talking about before the show is this -- all of this complexity. so when -- it. >> it's crazy. mortgage-backed securities that were rated triple-a by a bunch of
. and i said this to tim geithner, the treasury secretary. that means henry paulson, ben bernanke, were the dentists. how does that make you feel, the thing that everybody hates is the thing you had to do. >> let me tell you, i felt like i was having a root canal. >> without anesthesia. >> i was a dentist having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. but there's a scene in the book -- my book, "on the brink," and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. and what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts and it would be the treasury secretary that did all these interventions. then, i said, that would be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble together something that works for citigroup and it goes down. bi i'll be the treasury secretary who presides over another great depression. >> back with david gergen and diane brady. the reason we have you guys on is because you're honest about this. i think -- i think henry paulson had it right on there and there's a whole lot of revisionist h
room that we were very fortunate as a country to have in place. we had hank. we have ben bernanke. we have tim geithner, and we had sheila bair, the head of the fdic. and i know a lot people in finance. i know a lot of people in business. i know a lot of people in government. and i can't think of four that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable now to look back and pick out one little aspect or another of what was happening then, but our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008 when the talk was, are our money market funds safe? now, when you have 3.5 or more trillion of funds held by 30 million people, who on a sunday night are worrying about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all the deposits held by u.s. banks at the time. you have a panic. you had commercial paper freeze up entirely, and you had some of the biggest companies in the united states, and some of them are described in this book, to worry about whether they're going t
said that means henry paulson, tim geithner, and ben bernanke are the dentists. >> let me tell you. i felt like i was having a root canal. >> without anesthesia. >> i was a dentist having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. but there's a saying in the book on -- my book "on the brink," and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. and what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts, and it would be the secretary treasure that did all these interventions. i said that will be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble something that works for citigroup and if it goes down i'll be the secretary treasurer that pre sides over night great recession. >> back with david gergen and diane brady. the reason we have you guys on is because you're honest about this. think henry paulson had it right on there. there's a whole lot of revisionist history going on at capitol hill. diane and david, we were all together during that time, and it seemed like the right thing to do to a lot of people who a
in place. we had hank, ben bernanke tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people in finance and a lot of people in business and government. and i can't think of for that would have done a better job of getting us through that. now it's kind of fashionable to look back and pick at one aspect or another of what was happening and our country's financial system froze up during that period. some of you in this room were at a party i was at in september of 2008, one to talk was the money market funds saved. if we have 3.5 trillion fun missile by 30 million people who on is and they might are worrying about whether they can get their money that was half of all the process held by u.s. banks at the time you have a panic. you had commercial paper frees up entirely in the biggest companies of the united states and some are described in this book that worried whether they were going to meet their payroll and a short period of time to read the sixth largest bank in the country in terms of the domestic deposits, washington mutual failed over a weekend. you had the th
do you regret? where did you look back and say "that was the wrong call, by me, geithner, bernanke"? >> charlie i've thought about this a lot and i'm going to give you a number of mistakes i think i was involved in making. but the in 20/20 hindsight, the major decisions we made, i'm totally convinced, were the right calls and they were made in the face of unprecedented challenges with really imperfect tools without the authorities we needed in the middle of a very challenging political period with an election coming. and the reason i they is they worked and they prevented the collapse. so most of what is cited as mistakes were really things we had no control over. for instance, i would like to have seen the a.i.g. problem coming earlier. but there was no regulator that had responsibility for the whole institution and we just didn't have a clear line of sight and we didn't... we didn't have the information. i do not want to have lehman fail. i knew that would be a bad thing and we worked very hard to prevent it. but we didn't have the authorities to prevent the failure of he plan. .
. bernanke. -- thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2010] ♪ >> we have quite a lineup on this isle. only a couple on the other. we need a few more folks down here. we've already had to pull some day -- a fulsome day. let's proceed to our question and answer session. we have three other excellent speakers, so a lot to look forward to. i want the banking for coming and your excellent attention. this is our fifth symposium and they seem to get better every year, if that is indeed possible. thank you all for making this such a productive in event. all right, we will begin with our question and answer is, and because there are more of you then of view, we're going to start on this side. >> this is a question for mr. kantor. and cultural prophets redeem themselves with accurate insights? >> i am not sure that i understand the question. >> you are talking about cultural prophesied and you believe that they cannot predict accurately. but can the kid rick -- redeem themselves? >> i am not sure what you mean by t
as a country to have in place, hank, ben bernanke kumbaya tim geithner and sheila bair the head of the fdic. i know a lot of people and finance and business and government. i cannot think of for that would have done a better job. but to look back of our country's financial system throes of during that period. some of you were in a party i was that in 2008 when the talk, when you have 3.5 four more trillion held by 30 million people on a sunday night are worried about whether they can get their money, that money was half of all deposits held in the banks at that time. you have a panic. you have commercial paper frees up entirely and some of the biggest companies described in the book worried if they would be payable in a short period of time. the sixth largest bank in the country with the maastricht staged domestic deposits and the third largest bank, wachovia, i needed a shotgun marriage on a monday morning and it just arrived this. interestingly the bookstores early september when fannie mae and freddie mac worry essentially bart -- broke. the two institutions guaranteed 40 percent of all res
them like you hate a root canal. that means ben bernanke, you guys were the dentists. how does that make you feel the thing that everyone hates sts thing you had to do. >> i felt like i was having a root canal without anesthesia at the same time. there's a scene in my book "on the brink." and this was a day or two before we were going to need to step in and rescue citigroup. what really hit me was that i was forever going to be associated with these bailouts and the treasury secretary that did these interventions. then i said, that will be the good news. the bad news will be if we can't cobble together something that works for citigroup and it goes down, i'll be one who presides over another great depression. >> remember it was fanny and fred die and city citigroup and a whole host of other banks, ways to try to fix this without public intervention. he talks about the realization he was going to be forever knowns the guy behind the bailouts and how shocking it was. it came to him walking through the reagan library working through the citigroup stuff, the temple of free market t
. host: a couple other items, business section of "new york times," that ben bernanke has survived a challenge to his second term as chairman, and faces the delicate task of beginning to pull the central bank out of its extraordinary situation. guest: the economy through the fall of 2008 and through last year, in an effort to help banks and credit markets and to prevent the financial system from imploding. they did that by lower the interest rates, and now they have to pull that back. they have to pull the federal reserves investments in the economy back. and they have to do that carefully because they don't want to cause problems in doing so, which is something that could happen. it will be delicate. markets are watching when this will happen. if he doesn't do it right, you will see plunges in stock values. host: what is the update? guest: last week senate dodd announced he was at an impasse with senator shelby, and it's not a good sign. there are some republicans who said they were committed to get a bill. one thing to watch is bob corker, a new senator from tennessee, he's worki
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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